Every bride wants to be the star of her show. So why would any woman surround herself with a dozen bridesmaids?

Well, like having multiple children, having multiple bridesmaids is seen as the ultimate status symbol.

Five brides tell us why they filled their aisle with bridesmaids…

The rich and famous do it, so why not me?

In the pink: Vivienne Edge wanted ten bridesmaids to match husband Adam's ten ushers at their £55,000 wedding extravaganza

In the pink: Vivienne Edge wanted ten bridesmaids to match husband Adam’s ten ushers at their £55,000 wedding extravaganza

Vivienne Edge, 27, married husband Adam Myers, 37, a property developer, on July 30. The couple live in Leeds with their daughters, Mila, two, and Alexandra, eight months. Vivienne had ten bridesmaids and two flower girls. She said:

‘My fiance Adam started it when he announced he was having ten ushers because he had so many friends — I thought: ‘Right, I’m having lots of bridesmaids, too.’

‘Luckily, though, when I counted up my best friends, the number came to ten. I didn’t want to have an uneven number, as it would look odd in the photographs. Our two daughters were flower girls.

‘Having lots of bridesmaids is seen as something that the rich and famous might do, as well as ordinary brides like myself, so it’s something of a status symbol.

A few people clearly thought I was mad. My gran rolled her eyes and laughed: ‘Why can’t you just do things like a normal person?!’

As well as coordinating dresses the girls also got matching nightwear to get ready in

As well as coordinating dresses the girls also got matching nightwear to get ready in

‘There were no disagreements about the bridesmaid dresses we chose — a light-pink halterneck — though a couple of the girls worried they might be showing a little too much cleavage. But they thought: ‘It’s Vivienne’s day, we’ll just go along with whatever she wants.’ I really appreciated that.

‘We kept the cost down by buying the gowns from the online retailer ASOS, so the dress bill came to around £1,000. But as the whole wedding cost £55,000, it didn’t make much of a dent in the budget.

‘I had worried that I would have to organise all the girls, and that gave me a few sleepless nights. But they were fabulous, and brilliant at organising themselves without much input from me.

‘Thankfully, they helped calm my nerves on the morning, before the ceremony. One of them even said: ‘I’m going to wear wedges, not stilettos, so that I can run anywhere you need.’ The ultimate sacrifice!

‘There were one or two mishaps, though. At one point, one of the girls opened a bottle of champagne and it sprayed all over another girl’s dress, so we ended up drying her down with a hairdryer!’

There was no way I could please everyone

Special day: Jenni Clayton's ten bridesmaids were a picture in pastels, while the four flower girls wore white

Special day: Jenni Clayton’s ten bridesmaids were a picture in pastels, while the four flower girls wore white

Jenni Clayton, 27, is a childminder. She lives with her husband Jez, 32, a telecoms manager, and their two children in Caterham, Surrey. She’s expecting their third child in December. The couple married in October 2014, and had ten bridesmaids and four flower girls. Jenni said:

‘There were moments when I was planning my wedding that even I thought I was mad to be having so many bridesmaids. Just getting all of them — my eldest sister, Samantha, who was my maid of honour, my younger sister, cousins, nieces and my daughter — to the same place at the same time to try on dresses was a nightmare.

‘Eventually, we all managed to meet at Lakeside Shopping Centre in Essex, but that’s where the problems began.

‘Two of the girls were heavily pregnant, but would have given birth by the time of the wedding; one was going to be heavily pregnant on the day itself, some were slim, some were top-heavy. Judging sizes was extremely tricky.

‘Thankfully, it was easy to find a dress that everyone liked in two different colours, lilac and pink, while the four flower girls were in white.